Posted in History 4

This weeks inventions I learned this week

Leonardo Da Vinci:  Leonardo Da Vinci was born in Vinci, Italy.   Leonardo was born into a very rich family and had twelve siblings!  Leonardo moved to Florence, Italy looking for work as an artist, he was only 15 years old.  He became a prominent and skilled artist, sculpting, painting, drawing and inventing.  His most famous master pieces were “The Mona Lisa” and “The Last Supper”  Leonardo died the 2nd of May, 1519 at the age of 67.

Luca Pacioli:  Luca Pacioli was born in Sancepolcro, Italy.  Luca invented the double-entry book keeping technique.  Luca is most famous for his contributions to accounting and his book “Double Entry Book keeping” and he is generally referred to as the Father of Accounting.  He published other books which involved math, geometry, art and architecture.  He also worked with Leonardo Da Vinci.  Luca died in 1517.

Mariner’s Astrolabe: The Mariner’s Astrolabe was invented during the 1400’s by a female inventor by the name of Abd-al-Rahman-al-Sufi.  The mariner’s astrolabe was useful for trading purposes because it’s purpose was to determine the latitude of a ship at sea.  This improved sea navigation, which allowed for more accurate trade routes and discovery of new lands.  The Mariner’s Astrolabe gave rise to the age of discovery, which greatly benefited Europe due to increased colonization, raw materials and trade.  The age of discovery lasted 300 years!

Double-entry book-keeping: Double entry book-keeping was invented by an Italian man named Luca Pacioli during the 15th century.  Double entry book-keeping is a system where each transaction is recorded twice.  The first record is what comes in and the second is what goes out.  It made business accounting more efficient.

 

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Hi, my name is Ella. I love my amazing family and my two adored feline companions, Soxs and Rocket. As you read the posts I publish, you get insights on my homeschool life and many other fascinating wonders and captivating facts.

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